Health, Medicine

Ambulatory Voice Biofeedback: Relative Frequency and Summary Feedback Effects on Performance and Retention of Reduced Vocal Intensity in the Daily Lives of Participants With Normal Voices

Purpose

Ambulatory voice biofeedback has the potential to significantly improve voice therapy effectiveness by targeting carryover of desired behaviors outside the therapy session (i.e., retention). This study applies motor learning concepts (reduced frequency and delayed, summary feedback) that demonstrate increased retention to ambulatory voice monitoring for training nurses to talk softer during work hours.

Method

Forty-eight nurses with normal voices wore the Voice Health Monitor (Mehta, Zañartu, Feng, Cheyne, & Hillman, 2012) for 6 days: 3 baseline days, 1 biofeedback day, 1 short-term retention day, and 1 long-term retention day. Participants were block-randomized into 3 different biofeedback groups: 100%, 25%, and Summary. Performance was measured in terms of compliance time below a participant-specific vocal intensity threshold.

Results

All participants exhibited a significant increase in compliance time (Cohen’s d = 4.5) during biofeedback days compared with baseline days. The Summary feedback group exhibited statistically smaller performance reduction during both short-term (d = 1.14) and long-term (d = 1.04) retention days compared with the 100% feedback group.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that modifications in feedback frequency and timing affect retention of a modified vocal behavior in daily life. Future work calls for studying the potential beneficial impact of ambulatory voice biofeedback in participants with behaviorally based voice disorders.

from A1 via xlomafota.13 on Inoreader http://ift.tt/2nnPG8j
via IFTTT

http://ift.tt/2mVaRf0

Health, Medicine

Does Rare Vocabulary Use Distinguish Giftedness From Typical Development? A Study of School-Age African American Narrators

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine rare vocabulary produced in the spoken narratives of school-age African American children.

Method

Forty-three children from general and gifted classrooms produced 2 narratives: a personal story and a fictional story that was based on the wordless book Frog, Where Are You? (Mayer, 1969). The Wordlist for Expressive Rare Vocabulary Evaluation (Mahurin-Smith, DeThorne, & Petrill, 2015) was used to tally number and type of uncommon words produced in these narratives. The authors used t tests and logistic regressions to explore classroom- and narrative-type differences in rare vocabulary production. Correlational analysis determined the relationship between dialect variation and rare vocabulary production.

Results

Findings indicated that tallies of rare-word types were higher in fictional narratives, whereas rare-word density—a measure that controls for narrative length—was greater in personal narratives. Rare-word density distinguished children in general classrooms from those in gifted classrooms. There was no correlation between dialect variation and rare-word density.

Conclusion

Examining school-age African American children’s facility with rare vocabulary production appears to be a dialect-neutral way to measure their narrative language and to distinguish gifted children from typically developing children.

from A1 via xlomafota.13 on Inoreader http://ift.tt/2mR4BnE
via IFTTT

http://ift.tt/2o5xnSw

Health, Medicine

Language Development in Children With Cleft Palate With or Without Cleft Lip Adopted From Non–English-Speaking Countries

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine whether language skills differed between children with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (CP±CL) who were adopted into an English-speaking home from a non–English-speaking country (late English exposure [LE]) and children with CP±CL raised from birth in an English-speaking home (early English exposure [EE]).

Method

Children (51 LE, 67 EE), ages 3;0 (years;months) to 9;0, completed the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF), Preschool Second Edition or Fourth Edition. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the impact of age of adoption and time in an English-speaking home on language skills, as measured by the CELF-P2 and CELF-4.

Results

Children with CP±CL who were adopted scored less well on all language indices, with mean adjusted differences between LE and EE children ranging from 0.4 to 0.7 SD on the CELF index scales. Only 53% of the EE children and 57% of the LE children obtained scores above 90 on all indices. For LE children, younger age at adoption was associated with better language skills.

Conclusion

CP±CL increases risk for language delay, with the highest risk for LE children. LE children with CP±CL should receive language services soon after adoption.

from A1 via xlomafota.13 on Inoreader http://ift.tt/2nnTx5a
via IFTTT

http://ift.tt/2nnP2Ym

Health, Medicine

Canine fossa puncture in endoscopic sinus surgery: report of two cases

Publication date: Available online 22 March 2017
Source:Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
Author(s): Federico Sireci, Matteo Nicolotti, Paolo Battaglia, Raffaele Sorrentino, Paolo Castelnuovo, Frank Rikki Canevari
IntroductionChronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is a common chronic disease that often affects maxillary sinus. Endoscopic sinus surgery is the most common procedure for treating the majority of maxillary sinus lesions.ObjectiveTo demonstrate the role of canine fossa puncture during endoscopic sinus surgery procedure in patients with severe maxillary sinus disease.MethodsWe present 2 cases where canine fossa puncture has been performed as method to obtain a complete access to the maxillary antrum.ResultsAccording our experience, 2 cases on 296 endoscopic sinus surgery (0.6%) where antrostomy and used of angled microdebrider were not sufficient, canine fossa puncture has been performed as an alternative method to obtain a complete access to the maxillary antrum.ConclusionAlthough the advent of endoscopic sinus surgery, our cases support the fact that actually canine fossa puncture is a minimally invasive technique useful in selected cases.

http://ift.tt/2nnM99Y

http://ift.tt/2nCZGel

Health, Medicine

Preoperative chronic sinusitis as significant cause of postoperative infection and implant loss after sinus augmentation from a lateral approach

Abstract

Objectives

Among intra/postoperative complications of sinus augmentation from a lateral approach, postoperative infection and implant loss are particularly important because they have irreversible consequences. The purpose of this study was to determine the causes of postoperative infection and implant loss after a lateral approach and to determine the appropriate prophylaxis and therapy.

Materials and methods

In total, 109 patients (121 sinuses, 252 implants) were included in this study. The correlation between postoperative infection and implant loss and clinical variables was assessed using logistic regression analyses.

Results

Postoperative infection and implant loss occurred in 8/121 sinuses (6.6%). Infection had the strongest correlation to preoperative chronic sinusitis (p = 0.007), followed by timing of implant insertion. Implant loss had the strongest correlation to preoperative chronic sinusitis (p = 0.007), followed by sex, diabetes, postoperative use of dentures, and intraoperative perforation of the sinus membrane.

Conclusions

Preoperative chronic sinusitis could be a significant cause of postoperative infection and implant loss when using sinus augmentation from a lateral approach. For appropriate prophylaxis and therapy, it is necessary to diagnose the presence of chronic sinusitis that should be treated with proper methods prior to sinus augmentation.

from A1 via xlomafota.13 on Inoreader http://ift.tt/2mVgiKE
via IFTTT

http://ift.tt/2nCTFhW

Health, Medicine

Vagus nerve stimulation therapy improved refractory epilepsy secondary to acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS)

Publication date: Available online 22 March 2017
Source:Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery
Author(s): Machiko Morita, Ayataka Fujimoto, Tohru Okanishi, Mitsuyo Nishimura, Keishiro Sato, Sotaro Kanai, Hideo Enoki
Acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a rare condition. The seizure control of this encephalopathy is poor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the utility of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in a patient with AERRPS. A 14-year-old boy presented with fever and headache. He developed epileptic facial twitching and eyelid fluttering. Various types of antiepileptic drugs did not control his seizures. He underwent VNS at the age of 21.After 5years of VNS therapy, his seizure frequency decreased from daily to monthly.For patients with AERRPS, VNS may be a treatment option.

from A1 via xlomafota.13 on Inoreader http://ift.tt/2nCEPYF
via IFTTT

http://ift.tt/2nK1oeF